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Paul Rasmussen & Eric Evans

Paul Rasmussen & Eric Evans

Paul Rasmussen: Paul wants to live in a world where he can golf every day of the year, he has an unlimited number of “Do Overs," and he hits every goal he sets for himself. As a project manager, one of Paul’s strengths lies in managing multi-faceted Agile projects. After tackling some tough ones, he’s learned a lot about which management styles do and don’t work in a given situation, when and how to ask the hard questions, and how to identify who can be counted on at critical junctures. Throughout the project cycle, he strives to give team members and clients more than what they expect. “When I can do that, it’s amazing to see the lasting business and personal relationships that are made.” Outside of work, you are likely to find Paul at the golf course, brewing up his own specialty beer, or whipping up something new and crazy for Saturday breakfast. The past few years he has spent an inordinate amount of time assembling toys for his kids. Paul grew up in Sparta, near LaCrosse WI. He graduated with a degree in Management Information Services from UW - Oshkosh. He and his wife Jody have two daughters (Maddison & Skylar) and a son (Dyllan).

Eric Evans: Eric has spent his career leading large client-consultant teams, managing multi-year engagements, budgeting, estimating, and recruiting to the needs of his clients. Currently, he oversees day-to-day operations to support the growth and add to the bottom line of Omni. He has worked with multiple Fortune 500 clients with a focus towards bringing business value to all levels of the organization. In addition to being a dynamic leader, Eric has been a manager or people, an architect, a programmer, a project manager, a steel salesman and a paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division of the United States Army.

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Whenever a new technology is introduced to an organization, people tend to get nervous and business process management (BPM) is no exception. When a company begins to automate a business process, the employees whose job it is to manually complete those tasks may become concerned. Will this change the way they work? Will the new technology be overwhelming? Even worse, are they being automated out of a job?